No Song is Safe From Us

No Song Is Safe From Us - The NYFOS Blog
 |  Dalit Warshaw

This week’s Song of the Day curator is composer and thereminist Dalit Warshaw! Dalit is also performing with NYFOS this week in our concert From Russia to Riverside Drive: Rachmaninoff and Friends, yesterday in Boston and tomorrow (Tuesday, Nov 10) at Merkin Concert Hall at Kaufman Music Center. A few tickets are still available if […]




 |  Joe Nocera

Today’s Song of the Day selection comes from New York Times columnist Joe Nocera: When Native Dancer was first released in 1974, it was marketed as a Wayne Shorter album. That made a certain undeniable sense: an alumnus of one of Miles Davis’s greatest groups (it also included Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams and Ron Carter), Shorter was by […]




 |  Joe Nocera

Today’s Song of the Day selection comes from New York Times columnist Joe Nocera: If you read my final New York Times op-ed column on Tuesday, you know that it drives me batty that American’s greatest opera company won’t perform America’s greatest opera. It has been nearly a quarter of a century since the Metropolitan Opera last put […]




 |  Joe Nocera

Today’s Song of the Day selection comes from New York Times columnist Joe Nocera: It is not exactly news that Adam Guettel is a composer of immense talent.  The grandson of Richard Rodgers (one is required to note that when writing about Guettel), he has a transcendent melodic gift, and has written more than his fair share of […]




 |  Joe Nocera

Today’s Song of the Day selection comes from New York Times columnist Joe Nocera: On March 7, 1965, Louis Armstrong was in Denmark, where he watched in horror the televised images of civil rights marchers in Selma being brutally attacked by police. When Danish reporters asked Armstrong for his reaction, he said angrily that he had become “physically […]




 |  Joe Nocera

We’re excited to have New York Times columnist Joe Nocera join us to curator this week’s Song of the Day. Welcome, Joe!  From Joe Nocera: I fell in love with Joyce Moreno—musically, that is—two years ago when I stumbled into Birdland one evening in search of a Brazilian music fix. The well-known composer-singer Dori Caymmi (“Obsession; “The […]




 |  Elliott Hurwitt

This week’s Song of the Day curator is Elliott Hurwitt, longtime friend of NYFOS and music historian specializing in the works of W. C. Handy.  from Elliott Hurwitt: Mose Allison was born on a farm outside Tippo, Mississippi, in 1927.  He got a college education, interrupted by a stint in the military, and arrived on […]




 |  Elliott Hurwitt

This week’s Song of the Day curator is Elliott Hurwitt, longtime friend of NYFOS and music historian specializing in the works of W. C. Handy.  from Elliott Hurwitt: Champion Jack Dupree was born in New Orleans around 1910 and died in Hanover, Germany, in 1992. Son of a father from the Belgian Congo and a […]




 |  Elliott Hurwitt

This week’s Song of the Day curator is Elliott Hurwitt, longtime friend of NYFOS and music historian specializing in the works of W. C. Handy.  from Elliott Hurwitt: They called the Count Basie Orchestra “The Band That Plays the Blues.” Its All-American Rhythm Section (Basie on piano; Freddie Greene on guitar, Walter Page on bass, […]




 |  Elliott Hurwitt

This week’s Song of the Day curator is Elliott Hurwitt, longtime friend of NYFOS and music historian specializing in the works of W. C. Handy.  from Elliott Hurwitt: We don’t know a whole lot about Geeshie Wiley, who recorded “Last Kind Words Blues” and a handful of other songs, except that she worked in a […]