No Song is Safe From Us

No Song Is Safe From Us - The NYFOS Blog
 |  Amy Owens

Tonight’s American premiere of Roberto Sierra’s composition 33 Sueños will be quite an epic musical journey. I have also really enjoyed listening to some of his vocal music for soprano, so here is the cycle Décimas. It is lyrical and beautiful, playful and stylistic. I particularly enjoy the spirited Amanecer which begins at 2:09 and Agua Maldita which begins at 7:13. If you have time to listen to the whole cycle, it’s absolutely worth it.




 |  nyfos

I told Michael, “We have got to bring that music to our mainstage series. Everyone needs to hear Daniel’s—what is it, a cantata?” At first we thought of pairing At the Door with other stories of thwarted lovers, picking up on the work’s story. But we saw a more interesting possibility, something to address our current national quandary about welcoming people of other nationalities into our country. Daniel is Persian-American, and At the Door is set to a poem in Farsi. NYFOS has ventured far afield in its 31-year history—a couple of years ago we did a song in Zulu. But it was time to open our borders even further, and Daniel Sabzghabaei proved to be our passport.




 |  Roberto Sierra

When I think of of exquisite writing for the voice and absolute masterful orchestration, I always think of this piece. For me this is the way to write for voice and orchestra. Absolute care about the registers, and the way Ravel keeps the balances has not been surpassed. On top of that, the gorgeous melodies and harmonies…




 |  Roberto Sierra

For my generation the memory of the Viet Nam War is not just a matter of history; the Viet Nam war is still vivid in our minds. As a young man I remember the horrors of this conflict, one that nobody really comprehended, yet millions had to go and fight not knowing if they would come back safe. Many did not, and others came back with problems and memories that would haunt them forever.




 |  Roberto Sierra

The inimitable Carlos Gardel was known throughout the world as the leading tango singer during the 1930’s. “El día que me quieras” (“The day you will love me”) is not a tango, but since its debut in 1935 this Latin American jewel became inseparable to the voice and the romantic image of Gardel.




 |  Roberto Sierra

No other moment in music comes as close to the ideal of perfection as this trio. The undulating string sounds suggest the soft undulating waves that takes us into the imaginary journey of this delightful farce. The combination of the vocal lines with the different harmonizations is what makes this music so striking. Particularly moving are the last statements of “ai nostri desir”, where on the word “desir” (desire) a dissonant chord of utmost beauty conveys a sense of longing and profound nostalgia. “May the elements respond kindly to our desires” said perhaps with tears in our eyes.




 |  Roberto Sierra

These are the sounds of salsa that I remember growing up in Puerto Rico, and these are the same sounds of Latin Music that could be heard in New York during the 1970’s! The amazing musicianship, timing, rhythm and impeccable musicianship are just masterful. Particularly moving for me is to see this group of Latinos in Zaire (now known as the Democratic Republic of the Congo) bringing Salsa back to its musical roots.