No Song is Safe From Us

No Song Is Safe From Us - The NYFOS Blog
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Returning to New York Festival of Song this month in two tour performances of Arias and Barcarolles and other Bernstein Songs, and in December’s performances of A Goyishe Christmas to You!, Joshua Jeremiah is a “rich-voiced” baritone (The New York Times) and our Artist of the Month! You have performed in NYFOS’s annual holiday show A Goyishe Christmas to You! […]




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Irish mezzo-soprano Naomi Louisa O’Connell discusses her preparation process, favorite artists, and how friendly New Yorkers really are as our Artist of the Month. Naomi will join NYFOS in its Mostly Mozart Festival debut on August 8th.




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This song trips so many of my triggers, with a vocal line that sounds like it could have been written by John Dowland, and an accompaniment that has some of the delicate twists, turns, and bizarre musical punctuation of Poulenc.




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Celebrated actress Kathleen Chalfant answers our questions as NYFOS’s Artist of the Month in advance of her sold-out performance in NYFOS’s Lyrics by Shakespeare in the 2018 Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center. You received a Lifetime Achievement award at the 2018 Obies (Congratulations!) How does it feel to be honored for a ‘lifetime’ of work?  What […]




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Wow, there are a lot of things on youtube when you search for Shakespeare! Lots of chaff and some interesting wheat, like this dreamy recording from 1977 of Three Shakespeare Songs (“Full Fathom Five”, “The Cloud-capp’d Towers”, and “Over Hill Over Dale”) by Ralph Vaughan Williams, sung by the vocal ensemble Swingle II.




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Today’s Shakespeare song moves a bit further from his actual words, with an adaptation of this famous scene from Hamlet. Hector Berlioz sets Ernest-Wilfrid Legouvé’s text depicting the death of Ophelia, here performed by Anne Sofie von Otter with Cord Garben at the piano.




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Of course, English-speakers were not the only ones inspired to set Shakespeare’s words. Composers around the world worked with his lyrics in their native tongues, and we’ll be featuring some ‘Lyrics by Shakespeare’ in Russian and French in our August concert. Today, however, let’s try German.